Tomsk scientists first to study development of children from their conception to school

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It is noted that this project is unique for Russia - such long-term studies in the field of child psychology virtually don’t exist.

Psychologists from the Tomsk State University (TSU) began a large-scale study of the development process of children from the moment of their appearance in the womb up to school age. The project involves 600 families, reports the university press service.

“It’s a large-scale study, which allows examining a variety of factors that influence the child development, including perinatal, biological and social factors,” states head of the TSU International Center for Human Development Yuliya Kovas.

The university notes that this project is unique for Russia - such long-term studies in the field of child psychology virtually don’t exist. The first stage of the study will involve 600 families who are expecting a child, 300 of which underwent artificial insemination.

According to the Tomsk psychologists, the same genes may manifest themselves differently depending on the environment that surrounds the child; for example, slowing down or speeding up some processes of development. At the same time the environment can influence the human being directly or indirectly.

“TSU scientists want to identify the way this interaction occurs. During the research they will examine a variety of development factors: cognitive ones, child health, their ability to learn, and so on,” emphasized the press-service.

In the future, the scientists plan to involve more families into the project, not only from the Tomsk region, but also from other regions of Russia.

The International Centre for Human Development was created on the base of the TSU Faculty of Psychology. It is engaged in research in the field of cognitive science, studies human development peculiarities, their abilities. One of the most ambitious center projects is the creation of the Russian School Registry of Twins, which is part of a large international study.

Text and pictures by TASS